Review: Romantics Anonymous

“The show must go on”, as the old adage of theatre goes. Although, during the coronavirus pandemic, this has been incredibly difficult for the arts and entertainment industry. Any ticketed indoor venue has to weigh up the social distancing and sanitising costs against any potential profit they can make by putting on a show with a reduced audience. For a lot of theatre companies, it’s currently not a viable option.

Therefore, for many of us, we have to think back to pre-lockdown times to remember the last occasion when we were sat in an auditorium together, watching a live performance on stage. However, this past week offered a chance to see the latter streamed live into our own homes. On Tuesday, this was supporting theatres across the north of the UK, where the doors have been closed to the public for at least the last six months.

The performance was Romantics Anonymous, put on by the Wise Children theatre company. The story is based on the French-Belgium romantic comedy film Les Émotifs Anonymes, which has been adapted into a musical by Emma Rice. The plot is predominantly set in a chocolate factory. It follows the lead characters: Angélique – a shy chocolatier, and Jean-René – the factory manager, as they fall in love despite their social anxieties.

All the actors have been in a bubble together, which meant there was no social distancing necessary on stage – they could sing, dance and kiss each other, just like in old times. The performance was streamed live from Bristol Old Vic and each night this supported theatres in a specific region of the UK or the USA, with the funds generated in the price of a virtual ticket. Theatres close to my heart, as well as geographically, that were hosting the show that I saw were Theatre by the Lake in Keswick, The Lowry in Salford and Home, Manchester.

It was great escapism to watch this musical; for a couple of hours, life felt normal again. The story was sweet, just like chocolate, and I particularly liked the stylised elements of the staging – there were hardly any doors used on set, for example. The car chase scene was also performed innovatively without a physical car, as such. No spoilers – but there was mini remote controlled version!

Another adage of theatre is “the smell of the greasepaint, the roar of the crowd” – or is it the other way around? There was a socially distanced show performed to a seated audience at the end of the week. However, for the majority of the shows, there may not have been an audience in person to see the performance but it will have been enjoyed by many people, viewing over a screen as part of 2020’s ‘new normal’.

#JeSuisÉmotif.

About Katy Booth

Broadcaster and journalist who has worked in the newsrooms of BBC local radio, regional television and commercial radio for more than a decade. BJTC accredited.

Posted on September 27, 2020, in Opinion, Review and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Still have to wait till Blumenthal opens its theatre doors again. Blumenthal is actually working with NC theaters to figure out how to make theaters open again. The Square at Spirit Square is open- for an audience of 50 (that is the only outdoor theater part of Blumenthal).

    For a musical to come back to Blumenthal, Belk and Ovens need to open specifically Belk. Belk Theater is Blumenthal’s main theater.

    Slowly in the US, I am realizing theaters are opening- so far, those only belong to small theaters. This year, both Frozen and Anastasia got postponed- still have not been rescheduled. I am hoping that Hadestown will come to Charlotte- I see some hope that it will come due to coming October 2021.

    My last time I even saw a show in person was January. Opera Carolina did a production of La Bohème at Belk Theater- my mom and I originally weren’t going to see it, but a church member gave us to tickets to that opera. I wanted to see La Bohème for a long time- finally that happened.

    Like

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